As the Adjunctiverse Turns

cheeky, no respect for academia

Cartoon of the day

A late #Valentine for #precarioustimes

occasional links & commentary

valentine-s-clearance-1-682valentine-s-clearance-2-b29  valentine-s-clearance-3-df5valentine-s-clearance-4-c1evalentine-s-clearance-5-1f5valentine-s-clearance-6-fd1

View original post

Advertisements

Beyond Corporate Power

Be Freedom

Also in Counterpunch

iu-26

The problem is not that the corporations are “out of control,” the problem is that the corporations are so much “in control.” By seeing neoliberalism as Free Market Fundamentalism (FMF) rather than Corporate Power we underestimate the challenges ahead. FMF does not help us to know what tactics and strategies are best because it cannot tell us about the enemy we face: Corporate Power.

If the corporations have merged with the state, then the liberal-regulatory state is finished and our faith in it’s ability to protect us is a poor substitute for self-knowlege and self-determination. Instead, we should realize that we are finally on our own. Mass movements making revolutionary demands and organizing projects aimed at building independent people power will have the best chance at overthrowing the corporate power.

The tension between seeing the problem as FMF or as corporate power will only be resolved by the highest…

View original post 2,038 more words

You Can’t Go Home Again: The Liberal State Is No More

Something to read instead of watching tonight’s “Build the Wall” commercial (aka SOTU) or, if you must, then while you are watching it.

Be Freedom

Also in Counterpunch.

In a previous article I argued that often confusing and divergent arguments within the neoliberal critique could be best understood as the tensions between two opposing currents of thought. One tendency understands neoliberalism as the unfettered reign of the free market, often called Free Market Fundamentalism (FMF), the other sees neoliberalism as the fusion of the corporation and the state sometimes called Corporate Power.

If it’s FMF what does that mean for activism. If it’s Corporate Power what does that imply for strategy?

The greater the emphasis on FMF then the more possible it might seem to re-regulate the corporations back to within tolerable limits after recapturing the state through elections. The greater the emphasis on corporate power the less possible incremental (primarily) electoral approaches seem, and the more likely that revolutionary measures will be required to abolish corporate power.

You Can’t Go Home Again

FMF remains such…

View original post 1,850 more words

No One “Deserves” to Be An Adjunct

After a brief hiatus, Adjunct Crisis is back in action with a wealth of recent posts for me to catch up with sharing. Stay tuned for more. If you can’t wait, then subscribe to updates by email or feed reader.

The Adjunct Crisis

Considering highly frustrated adjunct instructors, I will often hear even from some of the more “woke” full-time faculty, comments like, “it’s no wonder he/she is an adjunct,” or that “so and so deserves to be an adjunct.”

This needs to stop.

Sure, there may be adjuncts who, in applying for full-time jobs, either present themselves poorly or simply are weak in comparison to other prospective candidates, but no one “deserves” to be an adjunct.

When people ask me, in terms of my job, what I like to be called, I answer in two parts:

  • If you’re asking me to define how I’m regarded by the institutions I teach at, the state and federal governments that fund or define my working conditions, the tenure track faculty and administrators I work with, and even the unions that represent me—I am an adjunct.
  • I otherwise choose to define myself as…

View original post 613 more words

What If Things Would Never Be The Same?

Clay Forsberg

Update, January 15, 2019: I wrote a version of this seven years ago during the midst of the Occupy Movement. The change that many of us hoped for never happened. What is happening in the United States today is a whole different matter. It’s struggle for the definition of change. Some believe it’s a retreat to a time we can never go back to while others are pushing for an idealistic version that is fraught with unrealistic implementation and unintended consequences. But one thing I know is that the status quo isn’t an option – and it shouldn’t be.

As I write this, America’s federal government is in the midst of a three-week partial shut-down; a result of a vanity legacy project concocted by a president who has created the exact crisis that he contends this “beautiful wall” is going to solve. Like a petulant toddler, he’s threatened to declare…

View original post 910 more words

Neoliberalism: Free Market Fundamentalism or Corporate Power?

Be Freedom

I’ve been hearing about neoliberalism for a long time now and never could make much sense of it. It turns out the story we tell about neoliberalism is as contradictory as neoliberalism itself. Two currents within the critique of neoliberalism offer different analyses of the current economy and suggest different strategies for dealing with the gross exploitation, wealth inequality, climate destruction and dictatorial governance of the modern corporate order. 

These opposing currents are not just different schools of thought represented by divergent thinkers. Rather they appear as contradictions within the critiques of neoliberalism leveled by some of the most influential writers on the subject. These different interpretations are often the result of focus. Look at neoliberal doctrine and intellectuals and the free market comes to the fore. Look at the history and practice of the largest corporations and the most powerful political actors and corporate power takes center stage. 

The…

View original post 2,208 more words

Billionaire Heiress Lashes Out at Unions Because Her Fortune Didn’t Buy Election

Lessons to learn: 1) all educators must find common cause and work together across “categories” that too often divide; and 2) elections matter, so get involved.

There are more lessons, but these are starting points.

gadflyonthewallblog

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos Speaks To Media After Visiting Students At Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Betsy DeVos is furious!

She and her family spent boatloads of money this election cycle and few of their candidates won.

Instead, lawmakers were largely selected by these things called… ew… voters.

She was so enraged that she used her platform as Secretary of Education – another prudent purchase by her family – to lash out at teachers unions for – get this – having too much influence!!!!!

She told Fox Business Network:

“The teachers union has a stranglehold on many of the politicians in this country, both at the federal level and at the state-level.”

That’s rich coming from her, but one can see where she’s coming from.

In the midterms 23 states had double-digit percentage-point increases in turnout compared with 1982-2014. That resulted in a blue wave in the U.S. House – one of the largest and most diverse groups of freshman Congresspeople ever.

This is the

View original post 1,467 more words

Left behind

so characteristic of precarious life and work in precarious times

occasional links & commentary

The historically low black unemployment rate is one of Donald Trump’s favorite applause lines. Even Reuters [ht: ja] declares that Trump is right.

It doesn’t seem to matter that most of the decline in the unemployment rate for African American workers (from a high of 16.5 percent in the beginning of 2010 to a low of 6.3 percent today) occurred before Trump was ever elected.

fredgraph (2)

What does matter is that, even as the rate has dropped (the purple line in the chart above), black workers’ pay (the green line) has barely changed. After falling precipitously (by 10 percent, from the end of 2009 to the middle of 2015), it has only increased slightly (by 3.8 percent). Overall, the real wages of black workers have actually declined (by 6.5 percent, between the end of 2009 to today).

fredgraph (1)

White workers have suffered much the same fate. While the unemployment rate (the red…

View original post 302 more words

Kindness and compassion at work and elsewhere

Minding the Workplace

Dear readers, I’ve collected six previous pieces on kindness and compassion at work and elsewhere. Consider it food for thought as we enter the holiday season!

Valuing kindness over emotional intelligence in today’s workplace (2016) — “For years I’ve exhorted the importance of emotional intelligence in the workplace. But Bariso’s piece reminds us that a high EQ isn’t enough. By contrast, Rex Huppke, writing for the Chicago Tribune, suggests that kindness and being ‘a decent human being’ will contribute to better, more successful workplaces . . .”

Not-so-random acts of kindness for the non-saintly among us (2015) — “Last November, I was crossing the street near Boston’s Faneuil Hall when I saw a man huddled in a blanket, shuffling past me in the opposite direction. I caught a glimpse of his eyes for only a second, but I could see a lot of sadness in them. When I got…

View original post 245 more words

IG-Ready Photos to Use This Weekend to Encourage Your Friends to Go #ToThePolls on Tuesday

an election day treat, better late than never

Streets Dept

Welcome to the To the Polls Photo Share!

Please feel free to use any/all of the photos below across your social media channels over the next few days to encourage your loved ones and followers to vote on Tuesday, November 6, 2018!

HOW TO USE: It’s easy, just click on any photo you like below to load the hi-res version, then either hold your finger to the screen (mobile) or right-click (laptop/desktop) to save the photo to your device.

BE SURE to credit the artists if you use any of these images, the artists’ Instagram handles are listed below each photo for easy reference, and hashtag your posts #ToThePolls.

These are photos of the 10 murals created by 10 Philly-based artists for the Streets Dept + Mural Arts exhibition To the Polls… Click here to learn more about that exhibition and to read the…

View original post 195 more words

%d bloggers like this: