As the Adjunctiverse Turns

cheeky, no respect for academia

Time is running out

Connecting the capitalism with labor, economic and climate collapses. Don’t be in denial about the outcomes.

More Jason Moore on the Exhaustion of Cheap Natures and the Crisis of Capitalism

More about “Capitalocene” https://www.google.com/search?q=capitalocene

occasional links & commentary

fredgraph (1)

Richard Reeves is right about one thing: time is crucial to capitalism’s legitimacy. The premise and promise of capitalism are that the future will be better than the present. And “if capitalism loses its lease on the future, it is in trouble.”

The fact is, things are not getting better for the vast majority of American workers. They’re falling behind. For example, as is clear in the chart above, the labor share in the U.S. nonfarm business sector has fallen more than 13 percent since early 2001—and there’s no indication that trend will be reversed anytime in the foreseeable future.

Time is clearly running out on capitalism.

It’s not as though Americans are unaware of this and other related trends, such as the looming climate crisis.*

PP_2019.04.04_taxes_0-07

Back in 2014, most Americans (62 percent) said the economic system in the United States unfairly favored powerful interests; only about a third (34…

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What it’s like as an adjunct wondering if your classes will fill, and whether it’s all worth it…

Climate Crisis Means the Ruling Class has Failed. Can the Working Class Inherit the Earth?*

another important post in a series that should be recommended reading for all

Be Freedom

Power For Profit is Still the Prime Directive

The climate crisis is proof positive that the ruling class is an utter failure — but it will not fall on its own. Can the working class rise to the challenge? It sure will help if we understand that our class interests are not merely the economic needs of working people — no matter how important that is — but the universal interests of a healthy planet for all the people. Let’s start acting like it.

The corporate solutions to the climate crisis must dodge the causes of the crisis. The ruling class uses deception and secrecy to limit public debate. When the facts become obvious and overwhelming corporate politicians simply refuse to debate it. Gag rules are back in fashion. When the people demand a Green New Deal the same politicians water it down and disarm it.

what-is-that-place-articleMeanwhile, the Corporate State pursues

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Doubling Down: The Military, Big Bankers And Big Oil Are Not In Climate Denial –They Are In Control And Plan to Keep It That Way.

and don’t you forget it for even the blink of an eye…

Be Freedom

“Capitalism, militarism and imperialism are disastrously intertwined with the fossil fuel economy….A globalized economy predicated on growth at any social or environmental costs, carbon dependent international trade, the limitless extraction of natural resources, and a view of citizens as nothing more than consumers cannot be the basis…for tackling climate change….Little wonder then that the elites have nothing to offer beyond continued militarisation and trust in techno-fixes. — Nick Buxton and Ben Hayes [1]

The ruling class may be an utter failure but that is not stopping them taking aggressive action on climate change. Their chief concern: maintaining power, control and profits at all costs. 

The plan is well underway and it sure ain’t the Green New Deal. Just imagine a more extreme version of the world that already exists: where healthcare is rationed; where wealth inequality strangles democracy; where austerity is a weapon of class warfare; where millions die prematurely from…

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“The Gig is Up: Campus Equity Now!” A Campus Equity Week 2019 Call To Action

Not too soon to start thinking about and planning for CEW2019.

The Adjunct Crisis

One of the main organizing tools for improving the plight of adjunct-contingent faculty has been Campus Equity Week or CEW.

Initially, CEW was a biannual adjunct-contingent organizing tool, where, during the last full week in October, adjunct-contingent faculty, faculty unions, and other supporting groups would, at their respective campuses, hold everything from rallies to seminars to guerilla theater to call attention to the unequal labor conditions faced by adjunct-contingent Higher Ed faculty.

Some campuses, such as my own, which are two-year colleges, have chosen to make Campus Equity Week an annual event because, with our ever-revolving student population and leadership, doing the event biannually would cause a lack of continuity and connection.

Some campuses and organizations, out of their own institutional necessities, will hold the event earlier or later by a week or so.

What’s important is that adjunct-contingent faculty get out and advocate, and encourage others, from students, to…

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Getting Adjunct Progress: Going Beyond the Local Part I: Local Limitations

Late to reblog this excellent piece ~ all info still good and points as valid as ever.

The Adjunct Crisis

This is the first in a series of entries looking at the needs and challenges of addressing the adjunct crisis beyond the immediacy of the local bargaining unit.

Adjunct activists, (and by the way, if you 1) have happened to read this, 2) are an adjunct/contingent teacher, and 3) want to be paid or simply treated like the academic that you are, guess what: you’re an activist, which means you’re responsible for sticking up for yourself. Welcome to the club.  I’m not sending you a card, but like your department chair, I will let you know that you’re “appreciated”) if it has not become already apparent, your local union is generally limited in the gains they can make for you. The main reasons for this are as follows:

It’s Not Their Main Concern. Yes, some “wall-to-wall” locals (units which include full-time tenure track faculty and adjunct/contingent faculty) act more on…

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Academic Ableism

Cane Adventures

In an article titled, Extremist and Disability Chic, academics Kauffman & Badar state: “we do not want disability to be seen as merely another form of good or acceptable diversity”. They argue that disability is inherently ‘bad’, a curse rather than a gift, something to be prevented, cured, segregated and institutionalised.

According to Kauffman & Badar, because I think that my disability is ‘good’, and as it isn’t something I actively seek to ‘cure’, I’m an extremist. Apparently, by celebrating my disability, and claiming that having a disability isn’t a bad thing, I’m advocating a dangerous ‘chic’ fad reminiscent of historic genocide or systematic violent oppression.

Now, unlike Kauffman and Bader, I wouldn’t dictate to anyone how to feel about their disability. I have openly discussed my own problematic process of embracing my visual impairment. I was so deeply in denial that I had sight loss that I completely…

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Call to Action: The Red Deal, Indigenous Action to Save Our Earth, June 19-20

Red Deal Poster.jpg Download hi-res poster here.

The Red Nation (TRN) invites allied movements, comrades, and relatives to two days of action and planning on June 19 and 20. The first day is a listening session and workshop to draft and implement the Red Deal, a movement-oriented document for climate justice and grassroots reform and revolution. The second day we will take action against the continued leasing of Indigenous lands for oil and gas drilling in the Greater Chaco Landscape and in Dinetah.

Take Action

We are drafting a skeleton outline of a comprehensive Red Deal platform that we will discuss and debate in the course of several community-wide meetings. This will not be a regional- or nation-specific document, but a document that will encompass the entirety of Indigenous America, which includes our non-Indigenous comrades and relatives who live here. This is a document so that our planet may live. We cannot…

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Speaking truth to power at work: Incivility & abrasiveness vs. bullying & mobbing

Minding the Workplace

Image courtesy of Clipart Panda

As I’ve shared with you before, dear readers, I sometimes use this blog to develop ideas-in-progress. This means engaging in some thinking out loud, so to speak. Back in 2015, I wrote about distinguishing workplace incivility and abrasiveness from bullying and mobbing (link here):

Readers from outside of academe may be amused to learn that research on bad workplace behaviors has broken down into several camps. Two of these are the incivility researchers and the bullying researchers. At organizational psychology conferences, it’s not unusual to hear remarks such as “oh, she’s an incivility person” or “no, he’s more into bullying.”

When I started this work over 15 years ago, I treated these behaviors as parts of a spectrum, with many overlaps present, but it’s clear that sharper lines are being drawn, at least for the purposes of putting together panel discussions and writing dissertations.

For…

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Pearson’s Plans for 2025: Make Sure You Are Seated When You Read This

Diane Ravitch's blog

Pearson has plans for the future. Its plans involve students, education, and profits. Pearson, of course, is the British mega-publishing corporation that has an all-encompassing vision of monetizing every aspect of education.

Two researchers, Sam Sellar and Anna Hogan, have reviewed Pearson’s plans. It is a frightening portrait of corporate privatization of teaching and of student data, all in service of private profit.

Pearson 2025: Transforming teaching and privatising education data, by Sam Sellar and Anna Hogan, discusses the potentially damaging effects of the company’s strategy for public education globally. It raises two main issues of concern in relation to the integrity and sustainability of schooling:

  1. the privatization of data infrastructure and data, which encloses innovation and new knowledge about how we learn, turning public goods into private assets; and
  2. the transformation and potential reduction of the teaching profession, diminishing the broader purposes and outcomes of public schooling.

You…

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