As the Adjunctiverse Turns

cheeky, no respect for academia

Call to Action: The Red Deal, Indigenous Action to Save Our Earth, June 19-20

Red Deal Poster.jpg Download hi-res poster here.

The Red Nation (TRN) invites allied movements, comrades, and relatives to two days of action and planning on June 19 and 20. The first day is a listening session and workshop to draft and implement the Red Deal, a movement-oriented document for climate justice and grassroots reform and revolution. The second day we will take action against the continued leasing of Indigenous lands for oil and gas drilling in the Greater Chaco Landscape and in Dinetah.

Take Action

We are drafting a skeleton outline of a comprehensive Red Deal platform that we will discuss and debate in the course of several community-wide meetings. This will not be a regional- or nation-specific document, but a document that will encompass the entirety of Indigenous America, which includes our non-Indigenous comrades and relatives who live here. This is a document so that our planet may live. We cannot…

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Speaking truth to power at work: Incivility & abrasiveness vs. bullying & mobbing

Minding the Workplace

Image courtesy of Clipart Panda

As I’ve shared with you before, dear readers, I sometimes use this blog to develop ideas-in-progress. This means engaging in some thinking out loud, so to speak. Back in 2015, I wrote about distinguishing workplace incivility and abrasiveness from bullying and mobbing (link here):

Readers from outside of academe may be amused to learn that research on bad workplace behaviors has broken down into several camps. Two of these are the incivility researchers and the bullying researchers. At organizational psychology conferences, it’s not unusual to hear remarks such as “oh, she’s an incivility person” or “no, he’s more into bullying.”

When I started this work over 15 years ago, I treated these behaviors as parts of a spectrum, with many overlaps present, but it’s clear that sharper lines are being drawn, at least for the purposes of putting together panel discussions and writing dissertations.

For…

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Pearson’s Plans for 2025: Make Sure You Are Seated When You Read This

Diane Ravitch's blog

Pearson has plans for the future. Its plans involve students, education, and profits. Pearson, of course, is the British mega-publishing corporation that has an all-encompassing vision of monetizing every aspect of education.

Two researchers, Sam Sellar and Anna Hogan, have reviewed Pearson’s plans. It is a frightening portrait of corporate privatization of teaching and of student data, all in service of private profit.

Pearson 2025: Transforming teaching and privatising education data, by Sam Sellar and Anna Hogan, discusses the potentially damaging effects of the company’s strategy for public education globally. It raises two main issues of concern in relation to the integrity and sustainability of schooling:

  1. the privatization of data infrastructure and data, which encloses innovation and new knowledge about how we learn, turning public goods into private assets; and
  2. the transformation and potential reduction of the teaching profession, diminishing the broader purposes and outcomes of public schooling.

You…

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Cartoon of the day

On that other relationship between employment and higher education

occasional links & commentary

Tom Toles Editorial Cartoon - tt_c_c190314.tif

Special mention

new yorker Golden Escalator

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Workplace bullying and incivility: Does kissing up fuel kicking down?

…as we always suspected

Minding the Workplace

Does kissing up to the boss make one more susceptible to kicking down subordinate workers? At least one study suggests that there may be an association between the two.

Science Dailyreports on a recent study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology:

Kissing up to the boss at work may help boost employees’ careers but it also depletes the employees’ self-control resources, leaving them more susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace, a new study has found.

“There’s a personal cost to ingratiating yourself with your boss,” said Anthony Klotz, an associate professor of management in the College of Business at Oregon State University and the lead author of the paper. “When your energy is depleted, it may nudge you into slack-off territory.”

. . . Klotz [and his] co-authors examined how 75 professionals in China used two supervisor-focused impression management tactics — ingratiation and self-promotion — over…

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Promises, promises

as the economy grows, so does inequality because the #labor share continues declining

occasional links & commentary

labor share

They keep promising, ever since the recovery from the Great Recession started more than eight years ago, that the share of national income going to American workers will finally begin to increase. But it’s not.

Sure, profits continue to rise. And so is the stock market. But not what workers receive.

In fact, as is clear from the magnified section of the chart above, the labor share has actually been declining in recent quarters—even as the unemployment rate has fallen about as far as it’s going to go.*

But you don’t have to believe me. Even the Wall Street Journal has noticed this trend.

Labor’s share of domestic income has been declining since 1970 and has barely recovered in this expansion from lows last seen when the U.S. was pulling out of the Great Depression.

Employee pay and benefits as a percentage of gross domestic income fell to 52.7% in…

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The study on collapse they thought you should not read – yet

necessary guide for precarious times, HT to former #adjunct @RonPlacone

Professor Jem Bendell

A research paper concluding that climate-induced collapse is now inevitable, was recently rejected by anonymous reviewers of an academic journal.

It has been released directly by the Professor who wrote it, to promote discussion of the necessary deep adaptation to climate chaos.

“I am releasing this paper immediately, directly, because I can’t wait any longer in exploring how to learn the implications of the social collapse we now face,” explained the author Dr Bendell, a full Professor of Sustainability Leadership.  deep adaptation paper

In saying the paper was not suitable for publication, one of the comments from the reviewers questioned the emotional impact that the paper might have on readers. “I was left wondering about the social implications of presenting a scenario for the future as inevitable reality, and about the responsibility of research in communicating climate change scenarios and strategies for adaptation.” wrote one of the reviewers. “As the authors pointed…

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Cartoon of the day

A late #Valentine for #precarioustimes

occasional links & commentary

valentine-s-clearance-1-682valentine-s-clearance-2-b29  valentine-s-clearance-3-df5valentine-s-clearance-4-c1evalentine-s-clearance-5-1f5valentine-s-clearance-6-fd1

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Beyond Corporate Power

Be Freedom

Also in Counterpunch

iu-26

The problem is not that the corporations are “out of control,” the problem is that the corporations are so much “in control.” By seeing neoliberalism as Free Market Fundamentalism (FMF) rather than Corporate Power we underestimate the challenges ahead. FMF does not help us to know what tactics and strategies are best because it cannot tell us about the enemy we face: Corporate Power.

If the corporations have merged with the state, then the liberal-regulatory state is finished and our faith in it’s ability to protect us is a poor substitute for self-knowlege and self-determination. Instead, we should realize that we are finally on our own. Mass movements making revolutionary demands and organizing projects aimed at building independent people power will have the best chance at overthrowing the corporate power.

The tension between seeing the problem as FMF or as corporate power will only be resolved by the highest…

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You Can’t Go Home Again: The Liberal State Is No More

Something to read instead of watching tonight’s “Build the Wall” commercial (aka SOTU) or, if you must, then while you are watching it.

Be Freedom

Also in Counterpunch.

In a previous article I argued that often confusing and divergent arguments within the neoliberal critique could be best understood as the tensions between two opposing currents of thought. One tendency understands neoliberalism as the unfettered reign of the free market, often called Free Market Fundamentalism (FMF), the other sees neoliberalism as the fusion of the corporation and the state sometimes called Corporate Power.

If it’s FMF what does that mean for activism. If it’s Corporate Power what does that imply for strategy?

The greater the emphasis on FMF then the more possible it might seem to re-regulate the corporations back to within tolerable limits after recapturing the state through elections. The greater the emphasis on corporate power the less possible incremental (primarily) electoral approaches seem, and the more likely that revolutionary measures will be required to abolish corporate power.

You Can’t Go Home Again

FMF remains such…

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